Royal Caribbean’s Quantum of the Seas Delivers

Royal Caribbean’s Quantum of the Seas sails past the Statue of Liberty in New York on the evening of Wednesday, November 12, 2014. Photo courtesy of Royal Caribbean.

The truth of the matter is that two days is not nearly enough to experience everything you can possibly do aboard Royal Caribbean’s new Quantum of the Seas. In fact, two weeks might not be enough. She’s not just a cruise ship that takes you from Point A to Point B; she’s a destination in her own right.
After just shy of 48 hours onboard, that’s my takeaway from Quantum of the Seas: she could do circles in the Atlantic for seven days and her passengers likely wouldn’t complain. There’s too much to do and see right onboard this 168,666-GRT ship that is 1,141 feet long, 136 feet wide, and has 16 passenger decks. In fact, you’ll barely notice you’re sailing with 4,180 other guests.
Here’s a look at some of our favorite features onboard:

Two70

Is Two70 the best feature on Quantum of the Seas? It very well could be. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

Is Two70 the best feature on Quantum of the Seas? It very well could be. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

Without a doubt, this was the highlight of my Quantum of the Seas experience. By day, this is a spectacular aft-facing lounge that recalls the same kind of grand scale that Royal Caribbean has used in the past for their main dining rooms. By night, the entertainment here is innovative and imaginative, and a complete departure from cruise ship entertainment as you know it.

Original shows and high production values make for some of the most innovative entertainment at sea. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

Original shows and high production values make for some of the most innovative entertainment at sea. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

The production values alone are staggering, with a list of technical and creative credits that reads like a feature film. In addition to Starwater, Two70 will also offer Virtual Concert and Sonic Odyssey: original shows designed by Royal Caribbean Productions and Montreal-based Moment Factory – and I’d sail Quantum again just to see them.

NorthStar

There's no getting around it: NorthStar is just plain cool. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

There’s no getting around it: NorthStar is just plain cool. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

Yes, the London Eye-esque NorthStar capsule was a winner, even if you’ll only ride it once. It gives you a perspective of your cruise ship that has, until now, been impossible to see. It will also no doubt turn heads when she sails to the Caribbean in a few weeks and Asia in 2015.

Inside NorthStar's capsule. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

Inside NorthStar’s capsule. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

Even better, North Star can operate while the ship is at sea – something I had my doubts about. It’s also free – unless, of course, you’d like to get married on the NorthStar. You can do that, but for a fee.

Dining Options

There are plenty of free and pay dining options onboard Quantum of the Seas. Pictured here is Jamie's Italian on Deck 5 aft. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

There are plenty of free and pay dining options onboard Quantum of the Seas. Pictured here is Jamie’s Italian on Deck 5 aft. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

I’ll be the first to admit that I thought Royal Caribbean’s main dining rooms were some of the most beautiful afloat. Grand and sprawling, the main dining room on Mariner of the Seas still stands as one of the nicest I’ve ever been in. But although these large grand rooms are gone, Quantum of the Seas has something better: a multitude of more intimate venues featuring unique menus and décor.

Enjoying lunch in the American Icon Grill, Deck 4. Photo © 2014 Aaron Saunders

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